Coloring dope

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  • #41091
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi, I would like to know a good source for dye, to add to my dope, to color polyspan. Also, is it better to spray on after a couple coats of clear or brush on during the initial doping?
    Thanks in advance…….Jeff

    #47178
    Bill Shailor
    Participant

    Jeff,
    FAI Model Supply sells some pretty good dye. It is also easy to mix. Mostly thinner and a little dope. You can brush it, but for best results, it should be sprayed. For Polyspan, usually one or two coats of clear dope are needed as a base. Since the dye is mostly thinner, it doesn’t add much weight at all.

    #47179
    PAUL CROWLEY
    Participant

    John Clapp at FAI Model Supply sells dyes of various colors that can be mixed for even more colors for Polyspan. I suggest no more than two coats of clear dope and then SPRAYING the color on, no brushing. Follow his directions for mixing. I have sprayed many models with Polyaspan and this system works great.

    Paul Crowley

    #47180
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Again, many thanks.

    #47181
    Scott Lapraik
    Participant

    Interesting that this thread came up because I was wondering whether any one has tried Rit fabric dye as a colorant for dope?? Any thoughts?

    Scott

    #47182
    PAUL CROWLEY
    Participant

    I use Rite Dye dissolved in water to dye clealr mylar. So I do have some experance using it. I suggest you buy a box and try dissolving some in acetone, lacquer thinner or alcohol. If that works you should be able to use it. Let us know,OK.

    Paul Crowley

    #47183
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Years ago I used the dry form of Rit dissolved in thinner, decanted to remove a lot of undissolved material and then added to dope. I was using Sig dope and I think lite coat beautrite, not Nitrate at any rate. This worked very well and seemed to further plastisize the dope. It almost made it rubbery which is why I think it was lite-coat. The colors red and gold seemed to work like the aniline dyes that are used now. I do not remember any fuel proof problems but this was used mainly on rubber and gliders with an occasional gas job.

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