Looking for high thrust designs

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  • #42423
    JohnRiese
    Participant

    Hi guys,

    I recently built a new kit, a Starduster E36 from BMJR. Went OK till I gave it too much rudder tab and went right instead of left. Rebuilt and ready for retest.

    I really like these high thrust line designs as I am left handed. The timer is on the right side and I tend to tilt the plane to the left on takeoff, especially for VTO.

    Recently I received an O”Reilly/Holman Hustler for class C OS35. Too many ribs and spars plus other problems with construction that makes it too heavy. I estimate weight at about 50 ounces. Scientifically added up the parts and added fudge factor for wing covering, etc. I’m usually pretty close on my estimates.

    . Question for all you Nostalgia experts. What is another high thrust line plane I can build for Nostalgia? I’ve looked at the Amazoom which has too high an aspect ratio wing to fit into my airplane box at the nominal 750 inches square. Heard of the T-bird but can’t find plans on the ‘Net. Anybody have a reference for that? Other planes? I don’t want to buy plans on a guess, would rather see them online. I have been very successful making plans from a scan.

    BTW, if anybody wants a pdf for the Spacer at 425 inches I can send it to you. Prints out on big paper at the office supply place.

    Thanks,

    John in Kalifornia, recovering from knee surgery and ready to fly again



    #55748
    Steve Jensen
    Participant
    #55749
    JohnRiese
    Participant

    I like the T Bird, now that I know what it looks like. Downloaded plan into CorelDraw and rescaled. Looks like a 70 inch span would be about 750 inches square. 43 percent stab kinda big but is “of the times” I ‘spose. Recall some beefing up tips in a Digest issue a couple of years back. Anybody have that info?

    Thanks,

    John

    #55750
    DAN BERRY
    Participant

    Hot Head
    Hustler

    #55751
    JohnRiese
    Participant

    Any tips to make the Hustler lighter? I see that the plans for the smaller one (15 sized) has fewer ribs than the O’Reilly plans, which show ribs 1 1/2 inch apart! Why noit scale up the smaller one with commensurate farther apart rib spacing? I’d like to use the kit parts.

    John in Kalifornia

    #55752
    drake123
    Participant

    John
    At the NATS raffle last summer I acquired a Campbell kit T-Bird one and a half. Here it is just finished and it is lectric powered by an AXI 2212/12. Have no idea how it will fly but should be fun to fly. I can copy the plans if of interest. Just PM me.

    Coincidentally I’m finishing up an E36. Same kit as yours. I have a friend in RDT and have found that it’s pretty good insurance concerning unexpected flight patterns.



    #55753
    JohnRiese
    Participant

    Hi Again,

    Ordered plans for the Hot Head and T bird from NFFS. Found Digest article about beefing up the T Bird. Looks like I have some options here. Still thinking of the Hustler if I canfind a way to lighten it up. It has nicer lines than the aforementioned, IMHO.

    Thanks,

    John

    #55754
    DAN BERRY
    Participant

    Hustler is an FAI design and has more structure than needed. They had to put the weight in anyway so it became structure.
    When you scale a design you do not need to keep the rib spacing. You could lose a lot of ribs. You cannot add diagonal ribs.

    #55755
    Denny Dock
    Participant

    Two more that I always liked: Wild Blue…(Jim O’Rielley plans)and Salt lake Sadie. Both good looking models. Not the quickest builds.
    DDock

    #55756
    Denny Dock
    Participant

    Two more that I always liked: Wild Blue…(Jim O’Rielley plans)and Salt lake Sadie. Both good looking models. Not the quickest builds.
    DDock

    #55757
    MikeThompson
    Participant

    Another model is the zero. I am flying one in1/4A, weight 3.2oz. Bob Deshields flies both 1/4A and 1/2A. 😀

    #55758
    Denny Dock
    Participant

    I don’t know if i have ever seen a big Zero.Larry Davidsons BC T-Birds flew great.Gene Wicks flew purple BC T-Birds too.
    DDock

    #55759
    JohnRiese
    Participant

    These are all great suggestions. Anyplace I can see pics of planes/plans? Would go broke buying plans unseen for all of these. A sketch or scan from the ‘Net would be helpful.

    Dan, you were right about the Hustler. The plans show an area of 400 and some inches and a weight of 26 ounces. The hardwood fuselage crutch seems a bit of overkill for a free flight.

    John

    #55760
    DAN BERRY
    Participant

    John,
    Here’s a thing.
    When the high thrust planes gets big-750 inches- lots of things change.
    Mostly, the need to be REAL strong changes. The fuselage right behind the pylon/wing mount is a huge stress point. A 1/2A T-Bird as designed isn’t really strong enough. Scaled up to big— it requires lots of help. Putting a big heavy engine up high on the wing platform Means a big heavy thing on a longer moment.
    When these things hit hard ground on a DT is where the problems get noticed. The underslung fins are also prone to damage as well as exacerbating the issue with the fuselage up front. Another issue with older designs is rigid fuselage. They were designed with a fuse at the tail. Putting a DT up front–fuse or timer- puts forces on the fuselage that they cannot manage. The ZERO is a prime example of this phenomenon. That fuselage will actually warp from sunlight on side.

    The forces on bigger planes don’t increase in a straight line. I learned this the hard way when entering the world of planes bigger than 1/2As.
    Also, keep your DT angle 30 degrees or less.

    #55761
    drake123
    Participant

    Completely agree Dan. I took my new model to the back yard for a test glide. Snapped the fuse immediately. I had to laugh because I knew it would. Here’s how I have it reinforced now. 1/32 ply on each side and wrapped with fish line coated with epoxy. Time and warmer weather will determine where the next fracture will occur! Good tip on reducing the DT angle. I’ll tie some knots in the line.



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