Looking for high thrust designs

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Viewing 14 posts - 31 through 44 (of 44 total)
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  • #55777
    Peter Tolhurst
    Participant

    Sorry chaps

    I wasn’t thinking about nostalgia eligibility, just high thrustline models. I like the design so much that I’ve redrawn the wing for E36 (not just reduced everything as a %age). However, the build has stalled as I keep remembering the grief I’ve had with HTL models in wind and turbulence (although it’s probably my trimming 🙄 ) If I build it the fuselage will have carbon rods as longerons as recommended by Dean McG for the T Bird.

    Peter

    #55778
    JohnRiese
    Participant

    Just received plans in the mail from Jim O’Reilly for the “Greene Hornet.” Anybody have info on this design or Jack Greene? Think I’ll build one. Reasons:

    (1) Very simple construction. Fuselage is 1/8 balsa core with plywood outer shins. Pylon is simple sheet.

    (2) Wing ribs are all same size and at an angle, except for the root and tip ribs. This may make for some warp resistance. Not crossed over each other, more like a zigzag. Flat bottom thin airfoil.

    (3) Stab same simple construction as wing.

    (4) Six to one aspect ratio gives about 750 inches on a 68-inch span, just small enough to fit in my airplane traveling box.

    What do you think? I’ll run it by the Nos Gas experts at Perris tomorrow and get their opinions, too. Probably too cold to fly but I gotta bring the donuts for the traditional Sal Taibi brunch break.

    John in Kalifornia

    #55779
    Norm Furutani
    Participant

    The only Greene Hornet I’ve seen was flown by the late Gus Sundberg. If I remember correctly, it flew very well, but then all of Gus’ planes flew well. If I see Gus’ son, Bob, I’ll ask him.

    Norm

    #55780
    JohnRiese
    Participant

    Hey Norm,

    See you Sunday with a NosE plane, if I don’t crash it tomorrow.

    Drawing up plans for the Greene Hornet in a larger size as we speak,

    John

    #55781
    SIMON BLAKE
    Participant

    I built one to the original size for 1/2-A nostalgia. It’s a little on big side at 280 sq. inches for the Cox Black widow that I have on it and the other thing is that it seems to have an awful lot of dihedral (polyhedral). But it flies fairly well and should go a lot better once I put a Medallion 049 on it. I think it should be a better airplane in the larger size. That was the design that really started the move to high thrust in the 50s, with the T-Bird, Starduster, Hot Head, etc all being influenced by it.

    #55782
    JohnRiese
    Participant

    It does seem like a lot of polyhedral, about 14.5 degrees. The nominal is around 12 degrees. The Spacer is 11.5 degrees per side. In a construction article on the High Thrust Viking Carl Goldberg stated that the dihedral was reduced to aid in the climb to glide transition. The plans show about 10.5 degrees on that design.

    Maybe I should shut up a build one. The O’Reilly plans are only 30-inch span, a bit small for E36. However, this isn’t an electric model.

    John

    #55783
    SIMON BLAKE
    Participant

    There was an article and three-view on it many years ago in Model Builder magazine and I drew mine up from the three view. The rear fuselage is awful skinny and I believe I used 1/8×1/4 spruce top and bottom and I’ve never had it break. As you say — better to just build the darn thing than think about it too much — I’m sure it will fly well.

    #55784
    Steve Jensen
    Participant
    #55785
    JohnRiese
    Participant

    Thanks for the reference. I don’t see what issue that is from. Sez June, what year?

    John

    #55786
    Steve Jensen
    Participant

    1993
    @JohnRiese wrote:

    Thanks for the reference. I don’t see what issue that is from. Sez June, what year?

    John

    #55787
    JohnRiese
    Participant

    I thought I had all the issues. Missing that one. Do you have a scan of page 2 with the plans and rest of comments??

    Thanks, John

    #55788
    Steve Jensen
    Participant
    #55789
    Bruce Hannah
    Participant

    Dave Parsons flew a class”C” Green Hornet with a OS Max .35 it had one big issue the fuselage broke right behind the pylon every time.He finally hid a carbon tube the size of the inside of the box in that area about a foot long. That fixed it ,he got it go pretty good.

    #55790
    JohnRiese
    Participant

    That’s a good idea.

    The gurus at Perris yesterday agreed that the fuselage would likely break just behind the pylon and just in front of the stab. I like the carbon tube idea. Another method of reinforcement may be the carbon rods inset at each corner of the fuselage as was shown on the T Bird article in the digest.

    Serendipitously, if I make the wing to fit my travel box it will be about 750 square inches at 67-inch span. Now to draw up the plans. I ordered some 4-foot ling plywood for the sides.

    The consensus was that this would be something different instead of the usual Ramrods and Texans which are popular here.

    John

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