DENNIS KARGOL

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  • in reply to: Fuller Plast supplier #96031
    nffs-admin
    Keymaster

    This is an update from the supplier –
    In 1994, Gemini Coatings became the manufacturer of the catalyzed varnish “Fullerplast” when Fuller O’ Brien Paint Company was acquired by “The Grow Group”, a consortium of paint companies that included Glidden and Devoe (this has long-since been absorbed by PPG Paints). Gemini Coatings manufactured, distributed and sold Fullerplast until late 2017, when the main raw material (a synthetic resin) became unavailable by the supplier. We were unable to secure a new source for the resin nor were we able to produce a replacement for Fullerplast that would match the characteristics wood finishers around the globe had become accustomed to.

    We had a main distributor in Florida called “Van-Dee Decorating” but their inventory is depleted, and as of today, we know of no sources for any remaining inventory anywhere in the United States. With all this being said, trying to find a suitable alternative to Fullerplast will be difficult, and we are acutely aware of the issue, and offer these products as possible alternatives. Keep in mind that alternative products will have preparation and application parameters that may be significantly different than Fullerplast, so please do your research, read the technical data sheets and talk to the technical support personnel for whomever you choose to do business with.

    We recommend Asteria Conversion Varnish for applicators in all states except Colorado and California; For applicators in California and Colorado, where VOC laws are much more restrictive, we offer a low-VOC version (see attached Technical Data Sheets). Both products, because of the latest technology in wood coatings, are not going to be similar to Fullerplast in a few ways, the addition of catalyst in the correct amount is critical to proper film formation, dry/cure and long-term performance. Solvents for reduction are restricted to what is listed on the respective technical data sheets. There can be no additional solvents, tints or dyes without specific approval from Gemini’s Technical Services as there may be compatibility issues.

    The positive side of these products are, much longer pot life, higher build, virtually crystal clear resin, and UV inhibitors to help resist yellowing. These also dry to sand/recoat much faster than Fullerplast, but are limited in the total dry film thickness that may be applied to your wood surfaces. Please note this when reviewing the Technical Data Sheets. Below is a link to Gemini’s “dealer locator”, I encourage people to look for industrial wood coatings distributors near them as they tend to have a broader expertise in fins wood finishing practices.

    https://www.gemini-coatings.com/dealer-location/

    I am happy to elaborate further if needed, let me know how I can help.

    Brian B. Leck
    Technical Services
    Equipment and Sundry Purchasing
    Gemini Industries Brands

    in reply to: Announcements #96083
    Steve Jensen
    Participant

    Anyone willing to make prize donations, please contact Doss Porter 559-251-0787.
    CONTEST FLYER

    • This topic was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Steve Jensen.
    in reply to: Contest Information #96155
    Steve Jensen
    Participant
    in reply to: Construction Tips & Tricks #96939
    gstew
    Participant

    One of the best investments I ever made was buying a home-built building board at one of my then-local hobby shops back in the late 1970s/early 1980s. Top was laminated strips of basswood (lindenwood) with 4 2×4 stiffeners across the back-side. It’s just under 4′ long and just over 1′ wide. My only regret is not buying the 3′ one that hung around in that shop another year or so.

    I used it fairly regularly in the 80s-90s, then went into other areas of modelling and stored it in the basement of the place I lived at the time. The space was fairly stable temp-wise (maybe 45F-85F?) but could range far in humidity. When I moved from Mpls to MS in 2006, I saw the top surface had cupped slightly, a bit more than 1/32″, perhaps almost 1/16″ at the worse end.

    I cut some 2″ wide angle iron and screwed that in at each stiffener in an attempt to flatten it. It came back most of the way, but was still slightly cupped, now less than 1/32″ at the worse end.

    I spent some time last night resurfacing it… will post about that later. BUT it is now VERY flat with small areas out about a thickness of notebook paper. Gotta love it!

    My question to those that know softwoods/hardwoods better than I… should I use a finish on it? The topside did not look finished when I bought it, though examination of the bottom suggests either a thin soak in poly or similar or maybe an oil finish like on cutting boards.

    I’m thinking the latter. At least that would also offer some resistance to CA soak-in if it gets past the wax-paper/poly glue barrier.

    Thoughts?

    Greg in Mississippi

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