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  1. Tangent Classic
  2. Did you notice
  3. Romanian Junket
  4. Texas 27th Annual Spring Cup – Sanction #7966 – date Change
  5. The perils of flying in high grass

2019 TANGENT CLASSIC
FAI MEET

August 16th, 2019 F1 ABC& P
August 17th, 2019 F1 GHJQ&S

THE SAME WEEKEND AS THE WMC  NW Champs
FOLLOW THE SIGNS TO THIS YEAR’S FIELD SOUTH OF ALBANY, OR.

AMERICA’S CUP POINTS
Wayne Drake Perpetual Trophy for high time F1 A

F1 ABC&P    FRIDAY Aug 16th,  7 ONE HOUR ROUNDS ON THE HOUR BEGINNING AT 8AM.  FLY OFFS TO FOLLOW

F1  GHJQ&S SATURDAY Aug 17th ,  5 One Hour & 30 MINUTE ROUNDS  BEGINNING AT 8 AM.  FLY OFFS TO FOLLOW
(Additional round time to fly both mini contests

ENTRY:  $20 F1 ABC…$10 F1 GHJPQ, Jr’s Free

Prizes:  Glass, Points only for P, Q, S & J based on Historic Entry Levels

CD’s:      RON MCBURNETT 503-551-3173
E mail  acmeaero@msn.com
Mike Roberts 206 937 2740
alkiview@comcast.net
No Moto Flapping Allowed

Contestants must adhere to field/retrieval rules or face disqualification from the meet.

Be there….don’t let us have all the fun without you.

Mike & Ron

Did You notice ?
In a recent SEN in the report on the Australian World Cup events that there more participants in F1C than F1A ?   The Summersby effect?

Romanian Junket

From: Jerry Fitch

Romanian F1B Adventure
Walt Ghio and I embarked upon a weekend junket to Salonta, Romania, for two world-cup contests.  We left SFO on Tuesday May 7, changed flights in London , landed in Budapest on Wednesday May 8, picked up the rented Ford Focus, and stayed at a the fly/drive type Hotel Ferihegy near the airport.  Thursday was spent on a driving tour of the agricultural villages of eastern Hungary, making our way to the border crossing near the Romanian town of Salonta.  There we scouted the access to the flying field, then  drove to the Pension  Anthimos, in the spa town of Baile Felix, 45 minutes away in rolling ag uplands.  The hotel manager (owner?) was friendly and even bucked is some Romanian cash (the leu), adding it to our room tab.  We found the Romanians to be friendly and in many cases, English speaking.

The field, accessed via a couple miles of very rough road radiating from downtown Salonta, was flat with ankle-high green grass, drained by ditches at 1000 meter or so intervals.  There were many swampy patches scattered about, and by the end of 3 days everyone had acquired a characteristic pattern of knee-high mud camouflage.  But chasing on miles of short green grass was quite a treat, mud and all.   Friday we test flew amidst threatening skies and 10 mph or so of wind.

The Salonta Cup weather on Saturday was forecast to be nice, and it was, with scattered puffy cumulus and less wind, maybe 5 to 10 mph.  A regiment of high-school-aged young folk did all the timing.  The contest started at 10:00, with 1:15 rounds, which resulted in a late end to the 5 rounds and a single  10 minute flyoff at 7:00 or so.  This was won by Oleg Kulakovsky with a nice 7+  minute flight, if memory serves (sorry, I neglected to document full results, but I assume they will be posted shortly).

Sunday, day of the Szabo Miklos Cup, was even nicer and a bit warmer.  This one started at 11:00 local (or 10:00 Hungarian time, it was repeatedly emphasized by the Hungarian organizers), also with 1:15 rounds, so finished even later.  Again, a single 10 minute flyoff late in the day was held and won by Walt with an impressive 9:07 time.  We enjoyed the moment, packed up, and left the field in the dark, narrowly avoiding getting the Focus swallowed by one of the swamps.

Then it was back to the room at the Anthimos quite late.  We packed up the next day and saw yet more Hungarian villages on the return drive to Budapest, where we stayed at the fly/drive again.  Arising early for the return flight, the weather had turned ugly, with wind, rain, and cold.  Unless the weather was much different in Salonta, it meant we had a lucky break in the weather for Saturday and Sunday, sandwiched between sub-optimal conditions before and after.

The flying  was cosmopolitan and top-notch.  F1A launches of 100+ meters were routine.  95% of F1B flights looked like they were on rails.  I heard an F1C with a timer failure, apparently very well-trimmed, climb out of sight until it ran out of gas.  And there’s something good and right about chasing models across green grass, in sunny weather, all bent to that same limbic system-satisfying purpose:  Put up a perfect flight, chase it down, and bring it back.

Texas 27th Annual Spring Cup – Sanction #7966 – date Change

From: Faust Parker

The 27th Annual Spring Cup originally scheduled for May 18th – 19th , then
moved to the 25th – 26th due to extreme rains in North Texas, must once
again be postponed. The Hamilton Airport field is not suitable for access
until it has a chance to dry out. The new dates are June 1 and 2. Weather
for the week prior is forecast to be dry and the winds fairly light.

Faust Parker, CD

The perils of flying in high grass

From: Aram Schlosberg

We had so much rain in New York recently that natural grass grew knee high.  On Saturday the wind direction dictated that we fly from such a grassy area, west of Wawaywanda’s sodded fields.
.

I have a Bauer RDT transmitter and usually keep in my shirt’s pocket for the last umpteen year’s. Well, not being tethered around my neck or strapped around my wrist, it fell out of my shirt pocket just before It was needed to DT a model drifting to a primordial forrest to our north.

.

Obviously, in retrospect, shirt pockets are insecure. I suppose that the only things one should keep in one’s pants’ pockets is an iPhone essential for field communications and maybe a few small tools for field quick setups. Car keys and wallets are infinitely safer left in the car.

Aram